Evaluation of the policies of George W. Bush and his Republican conservatives on America.
Published on January 25, 2008 By COL Gene In Politics
Look at the caliber of the people who run the two non profit organizations that produced the study that showed Bush and his principal staff LIED about Iraq:


These are the Directors of the Fund for Independence in Journalism
Bevis Longstreth, Board Chairman
Bevis Longstreth is a retired partner of Debevoise & Plimpton and a member of the board of trustees of New School University and the College Retirement Equities Fund. He served as a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commissioner, a member of the Board of Governors of the American Stock Exchange, and adjunct professor at Columbia University School of Law.Amy McCombs, Board Treasurer
Amy McCombs is the former president and chief executive officer of Heald College, an 11-campus private college serving 7,200 students. She has served as president and CEO of Chronicle Broadcasting Company and president and general manger of KRON-TV, prior to which she was a broadcast manager for the Washington Post Company in Michigan, Florida, and Connecticut.Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, Board Secretary
Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, senior writer of U.S. News & World Report and contributing writer to the Los Angeles Times, was an Alicia Patterson Fellow in 1992. As a Pulitzer Traveling Fellow in 1986, she lived in Hungary and covered Central Europe for Newsweek and ABC Radio. A former journalism instructor at the American University School of Communication, she has written extensively for a number of major magazines and newspapers.Charles Lewis
Charles Lewis is the president of the Fund for Independence in Journalism and co-author of five books, including the bestseller, The Buying of the President 2004 (HarperCollins). He founded and for 15 years was the executive director of the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit, nonpartisan investigative reporting organization. From l977 to l988 he did investigative reporting at ABC News and CBS News's 60 Minutes. In 1998, he was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship and in 2004 received the PEN USA First Amendment award.
William Buzenberg
Bill Buzenberg became Executive Director of the Center for Public Integrity in January 2007. He has been a journalist and news executive at newspapers and in public radio for more than 35 years. He was in charge of News for National Public Radio from 1990 to 1997, and the head of News at American Public Media / Minnesota Public Radio from 1998 through 2006. He was responsible for launching such national programs as Talk of the Nation, American Radioworks, and Speaking of Faith. He was co-editor of the memoirs of CBS News President Richard Salant, Salant, CBS, and the Battle for the Soul of Broadcast Journalism.
Sheila Coronel
Sheila Coronel is the director of The Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. For 16 years she was the co-founder and director of the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism. She is the author and editor of more than a dozen books and received the prestigious Ramon Magsaysay Award for Journalism, Literature and the Creative Communication Arts in 2003.
Susan Loewenberg
Susan Loewenberg is the founder and producing director of L.A. Theatre Works, a nonprofit organization that provides cultural programming for public radio and outreach programming for children and at-risk youth. She has produced over 500 hours of radio dramas broadcast on National Public Radio, the BBC, Voice of America and other outlets.
John Newman
John Newman, a businessman with investments in information and publishing companies, is the president of the John and Florence Newman Foundation, located in San Antonio, Texas. He is active in many educational, health-related and cultural nonprofit organizations.
Geneva Overholser
Geneva Overholser holds the Curtis B. Hurley Chair in Public Affairs Reporting for the Missouri School of Journalism, in its Washington, D.C., bureau. She is a former editor of the Des Moines Register, ombudsman of the Washington Post, and editorial board member of the New York Times. A regular media commentator, she has also been a Nieman fellow at Harvard, Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science, and an officer of the American Society of Newspaper Editors.
Allen Pusey
Allen Pusey, managing editor of the American Bar Association Journal, formerly special projects editor for the Washington Bureau of The Dallas Morning News and Belo Broadcasting, was one of the first reporters to uncover the Savings & Loan scandal in the early 1980s. Pusey has received numerous awards for his coverage of local and national issues.
Paul A. Volcker
Paul A. Volcker, chairman of the Board of Trustees of the International Accounting Standards Committee, served as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve System


These are the Directors of the Center for Public Integrity:

________________________________________

BILL BUZENBERG, the Center's executive director, has been a journalist and news executive at newspapers and in public radio for more than 35 years. He was vice president of news at both National Public Radio and American Public Media / Minnesota Public Radio over a span of 16 years.

HODDING CARTER III is an award-winning journalist and the former president and chief executive officer of the Knight Foundation. He joined the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill as a professor of leadership and public policy in January 2006. Carter held the first Knight Chair in Journalism at the University of Maryland College of Journalism, and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University.
ALAN J. DWORSKY is an independent investment manager based in Boston who works primarily for nonprofit institutions. He and his wife established and serve as trustees of the Popplestone Foundation.
CHARLES EISENDRATH directs two national journalism programs of professional recognition at the University of Michigan Eisendrath's articles have appeared in The New York Times, Newsday, The Wall Street Journal, Time magazine, Life, Sports Illustrated, The Miami Herald, the Chicago Tribune, the Detroit Free Press, and the International Herald Tribune. He is an occasional commentator for National Public Radio's Morning Edition. He has served on the international jury of the Pulitzer prizes and is a member of the Inter-American Press Association. After reporting for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Baltimore Evening Sun, Eisendrath joined Time magazine, which posted him in Washington, London, Paris, and Buenos Aires, where as bureau chief he was responsible for all news operations in Hispanic South America. He moved to the University of Michigan journalism faculty in 1975, directing a master's program that placed all graduates on internships and jobs. Eisendrath holds a bachelor's degree from Yale University and a master's degree in journalism from the University of Michigan.
BRUCE A. FINZEN is a partner in the law firm of Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi, in Washington. As a mass-tort litigator, Finzen is recognized as a highly successful manager of cases involving multistate, class-action issues, and has played a leading role in some of the most important product safety and consumer health issues of the last several decades. He was one of the partners from his firm in charge of litigation on behalf of the government of India arising out of the Bhopal gas leak disaster.
BILL KOVACH is the chairman of the Committee of Concerned Journalists. He has been a journalist and writer for 40 years. He began his career at the Johnson City Press Chronicle in Tennessee and from 1960 to 1967 was a reporter for the Nashville Tennessean, covering the civil-rights movement, southern politics, and Appalachian poverty. In 1968, after a year of study on a journalism fellowship at Stanford University, he joined The New York Times, where he worked as a reporter and later as the chief of its Washington bureau. He left the Times in 1986 and was the editor of The Atlanta Journal Constitution for two years, during which time it won two Pulitzer Prizes, the first awarded to the newspaper in 20 years. He was appointed a Neiman Fellow in the class of 1988-89 and remained as curator. SUSAN LOEWENBERG is the founder and producing director of L.A. Theatre Works, a nonprofit organization that provides cultural programming for public radio and outreach programming for children and at-risk youth. She has produced more than 500 hours of radio dramas broadcast on National Public Radio, the BBC, Voice of America, and other outlets.
BEVIS LONGSTRETH (ex officio) is the chairman of the board of directors of the Fund for Independence in Journalism. A retired partner of Debevoise & Plimpton, he is a member of the board of trustees of New School University and the College Retirement Equities Fund. He was a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commissioner, a member of the Board of Governors of the American Stock Exchange, and adjunct professor at Columbia University School of Law. PAULA MADISON is the first African-American woman to become the general manager of a network-owned station in a top five market. In addition to being the president and general manager of NBC4 in Los Angeles, in 2002 she was named regional general manager of the three NBC/Telemundo television stations in Los Angeles. Until May 2002, Madison was the vice president and senior vice president of diversity for NBC.
JOHN E. NEWMAN, JR., a businessman with investments in information and publishing companies, is the president of The John and Florence Newman Foundation, in San Antonio, Texas. He is active in many educational, health-related, and cultural nonprofit organizations.
MICHELE NORRIS is an award-winning journalist with more than two decades of experience. She hosts NPR's newsmagazine All Things Considered, public radio's longest-running national program, with Robert Siegel and Melissa Block. From 1993 to 2002, Norris was a correspondent for ABC News. As a contributing correspondent for the "Closer Look" segments on World News Tonight With Peter Jennings, Norris reported extensively on education, inner-city issues, the nation's drug problem, and poverty. Norris has also reported for The Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, and the Los Angeles Times. Her Washington Post series about a six-year-old who lived in a crack house was reprinted in the book Ourselves Among Others, along with essays by Václav Havel, Nelson Mandela, Annie Dillard, and Gabriel García Márquez. Norris has received numerous awards for her work, including the National Association of Black Journalists' 2006 Salute to Excellence Award, for her coverage of Hurricane Katrina; the University of Minnesota's Outstanding Achievement Award; and the 1990 Livingston Award. In 2007, she was honored with Ebony magazine's eighth annual Outstanding Women in Marketing & Communications Award. Norris also earned both an Emmy Award and Peabody Award for her contribution to ABC News's coverage of 9/11. She is also a frequent guest on The Chris Matthews Show on NBC. Norris attended the University of Wisconsin, where she majored in electrical engineering, and graduated from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, where she studied journalism. She lives in Washington, D.C.
GENEVA OVERHOLSER, board chair, holds the Curtis B. Hurley Chair in Public Affairs Reporting for the Missouri School of Journalism, in its Washington bureau. A frequent media critic, she co-edited with Kathleen Hall Jamieson the recent book, The Press as an Institution of Democracy. Overholser was the editor of The Des Moines Register from 1988 to 1995. Under her leadership, the Register won the 1990 Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal for Public Service. She was named "Editor of the Year" by the National Press Foundation and "Best in the Business" by the American Journalism Review. In 2002, Overholser received the Anvil of Freedom Award. She holds a bachelor's degree in history from Wellesley College, a master's in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, and has received honorary doctorates from Grinnell College and St. Andrews Presbyterian College. Overholser was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard and a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association.
ALLEN PUSEY is the editor of the American Bar Association Journal in Chicago and a former special projects editor for the Washington Bureau of The Dallas Morning News and Belo Broadcasting. Pusey, who was one of the first reporters to uncover the savings-and-loan scandal in the early 1980s, has received numerous awards for his coverage of local and national issues.
SREE SREENIVASAN is a leading technology expert and dean of students at Columbia University's journalism school, where he runs the new media program. He is also WABC-TV's "Tech Guru." His tech reports can be seen on Thursday and Saturday mornings on Channel 7. His work explaining technology has appeared in The New York Times, Business Week, Rolling Stone, and Popular Science (where he's a member of the Geek Chorus). In March 2004, Newsweek magazine named him one of the nation's 20 most influential South Asians. MARIANNE SZEGEDY-MASZAK is a senior writer for U.S. News & World Report and a contributing writer for the Los Angeles Times. She was an Alicia Patterson Fellow in 1992. As a Pulitzer Traveling Fellow in 1986, she lived in Hungary and covered Central Europe for Newsweek magazine and ABC Radio. A former journalism instructor at the American University School of Communication, she has written extensively

Comments
on Jan 25, 2008
Yawns....

As i said, this group is funded by George Soros and other left wing outlets.  If you look even closer you will see they are not "independent" at all.

Move on with your life gene.


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